Vast Landscapes Escape the Edges of Tiny Frames in Barry Hazard’s Miniature Paintings


Source Colossal  

“Winter Cabin” (2021), acrylic and wood on panel with frame, 3 x 3.5 x 1 inches. All images © Barry Hazard, shared with permission

Sunlit mountains rise from lush valleys and foam caps the crests of waves in the expansive landscapes of Barry Hazard, painted at a scale that could fit snugly in the palm of your hand. Using wood panel as a base, Hazard builds up sculptural vistas in thick acrylic paint, detailing wildflowers, sandy beaches, and snow-capped peaks. Ranging from a couple of inches to about half a foot, his diorama-like Minis overflow from their tiny frames.

Hazard began working on a small scale during the pandemic when he was invited to participate in a show at Shelter in Place Gallery, a 1:12-scale gallery that operated in 2020 and showcased its exhibitions online when lockdowns made visiting physical exhibitions impossible. He relishes making the Minis because of the sense of immediacy evoked by the medium in such a small surface area. “A single brushstroke may capture an entire sky, and an idea or impulse might be completed in minutes or hours—not days,” he says.

Beginning with a frame sourced from a dollhouse supplier, he builds up the surface using acrylic gesso and modeling paste before adding vivid color. Rendered with loose precision, features in the Minis like paths, hills, and figures are clearly defined yet anonymous. Containing sprawling scenes in a tiny space provokes a type of reflection and contemplation that requires moving in close, rather than standing back to take in a grand view. “The scale is the antithesis to something grand or monumental,” he says, inviting viewers to approach “with less caution than a large painting and perhaps a greater sense of intimacy and playfulness.”

Hazard also applies similar techniques to larger paintings. He will have work presented by Good Naked Gallery at Barely Fair in Chicago this April and Future Fair in New York City in May. Find more work on his website and Instagram.

 

“Lovers Quarrel” (2020), acrylic on wood with frame, 2.5 x 2.5 x 1 inches

“Cove” (2021), acrylic on wood with frame, 2 x 2.5 inches

“Twilight Car” (2023), acrylic on wood with frame, 2.5 x 3 x 1 inches

“Gathering” (2020), acrylic, wood, and plastic on panels, 4 x 4 x 6 inches

Left: “Mini Canyon” (2020), acrylic on wood, 2.5 x 3 inches. Right: “Cemetery Tree” (2022), acrylic on wood with frame, 3 x 3 x 1 inches

“Spring Cabin at Winter” (2022), acrylic on wood with frame, 3 x 3 x 1 inches

“Rocky Shore” (2020), acrylic on wood with frame, 1.5 x 2 inches

Left: “Wildflowers (Poppies)” (2022), acrylic on wood with frame, 3 x 3.5 x 1 inches. Right: “Elevated Valley” (2023), acrylic on wood with frame, 3 x 2.5 x 1 inches

“Coyote” (2020), acrylic on wood with frame, 2.5 x 2.5 inches

“Beach Daze” (2021), acrylic and wood on panel, 4 x 4 x 7 inches

Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member today and support independent arts publishing for as little as $5 per month. The article Vast Landscapes Escape the Edges of Tiny Frames in Barry Hazard’s Miniature Paintings appeared first on Colossal.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Generated by Feedzy